The Ultimate History of Video Games

It may not be as epic as ancient Greece, but the history of video games is still pretty ultimate.  At least, that’s how Steven L. Kent portrays it in his 2001 book, The Ultimate History of Video Games.  Nearly 600 pages long, and filled with some black and white photos in the middle, his book covers not only the birth of gaming, from coin-operated pinball machines and Steve Russell’s Spacewar, but most things in-between, towards the release of Microsoft’s X-box and Sony’s Playstation 2. This isn’t the first book I’ve read related to the history of video games, but it …

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Happy Birthday, Sega Dreamcast!

It was the summer of 2001.  I’d been living in Japan for over a year, still in a company apartment in Fujisawa, just south of Yokohama.  Unlike my current residence, where the homes are older than Pong, Fujisawa was like a bright little city, with a convenient array of malls, comic book stores, and computer and game shops all crowding around the station.  It was a sunny day-off, and after taking the short-cut which ran through a Yakuza territory, I strolled into one of the many used game shops.  There, I saw the Sega Dreamcast.  And I wondered…what’s a Sega …

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Japan and the Playstation 4

There were a number of reasons why I decided to move to Japan.  One in particular, had to do with video games.  Growing up with the Nintendo Entertainment System, and always seeing that huge list of Japanese names during the credits after beating a game, it simply sunk in my young primary school age: Japan = video games. This ideology I’d developed never seemed to falter over the years, for despite the growing number of Western third-party developers, as well as Atari still struggling with their consoles, the majority of games and game systems came from Japan, up until the …

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